Ranked 24 out of 33

Pakistan

Overall Score: 66

Indicators of Influence

These seven key indicators highlight interference from the tobacco industry in Pakistan.

No. 1

Industry participation in policy development:

Indicator Score:

11 / 20

Progress has been achieved in applying larger pictorial health warnings on cigarette packs, however, the tobacco industry interfered by lobbying non-health departments to reduce the size of the warnings. Similarly, the tobacco industry lobbied the Ministry of Finance to add a third tier of tobacco tax, which resulted to cheaper cigarettes.

No. 2

Tobacco industry-related CSR activities:

Indicator Score:

4 / 20

Such CSR activities are not banned and remain a problem in Pakistan. Pakistan Tobacco Co. (PTC) was able to sign a Memorandum of Understanding with a few government agencies to carry out joint CSR activities.

No. 3

Benefits given to the tobacco industry:

Indicator Score:

8 / 20

The tobacco industry benefits by being able to sell cheap cigarettes through the introduction of a third tier of taxation. International travelers into Pakistan are able to bring in 200 cigarettes, 20 cigars or 250 grams of cigarette or pipe tobacco per traveler.

No. 4

Unnecessary interaction with the tobacco industry:

Indicator Score:

7 / 20

Based on publicly available information, government officials are not found to engage in unnecessary interaction with the tobacco industry.

No. 5

Procedure for transparency measures:

Indicator Score:

10 / 20

There is no public access to information about meetings between government officials and the tobacco industry. There is no requirement to register representatives of the tobacco industry entities, their affiliated organizations or individuals acting on their behalf.

No. 6

Avoiding conflicts of interest:

Indicator Score:

14 / 20

There are instances of conflict of interest involving government officials in activities linked to the tobacco industry. The Chairman of the PTC Board is a member of the advisory committee for the Federal Ombudsman in Islamabad.

Pakistan does not prohibit contributions from the tobacco industry or any entity working to further its interests to political parties, candidates or campaigns.

No. 7

Preventive measures:

Indicator Score:

12 / 30

The government must set up and implement a standard operating procedure for dealing with the tobacco industry. A code of conduct for officials must be developed and implemented immediately.

The government does not require the tobacco industry to submit information on tobacco production, manufacturing, market share, marketing expenditures, revenues or any other activity, including lobbying, philanthropy and political contributions.

Recommendations

These are ways Pakistan can deter interference from the tobacco industry:

  • Tobacco industry-related CSR activities must be banned. Government agencies must end all agreements and memorandum of agreements with tobacco companies.
  • There must be a register of all representatives of the tobacco industry entities, affiliated organizations and individuals acting on their behalf.
  • The government should require the tobacco industry to submit information on tobacco production, manufacturing, market share, marketing expenditures, revenues or lobbying activities.
  • Based on an assessment of implementing a standard operating procedure, a code of conduct for all civil servants should be implemented.

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