Ranked 18 out of 33

Turkey

Overall Score: 58

Indicators of Influence

These seven key indicators highlight interference from the tobacco industry in Turkey.

No. 1

Industry participation in policy development:

Indicator Score:

7 / 20

There is no evidence of the government accepting or endorsing policies or legislation drafted by or in collaboration with the tobacco industry. The president is open to the tobacco industry, which has approached the government to allow e-cigarettes and IQOS by indicating that these are non-nicotine products that will benefit the nation’s economy. Imports of e-cigarettes and their use in closed public areas are forbidden, however people may use them in open areas and there is no enforcement yet for online sales.

The government does not include any executives or representatives from the tobacco industry to participate in the delegation to the COP and any other WHO FCTC-related meetings.

No. 2

Tobacco industry-related CSR activities:

Indicator Score:

0 / 20

Government officials do not endorse or participate in tobacco industry-sponsored CSR activities.

No. 3

Benefits given to the tobacco industry:

Indicator Score:

9 / 20

The government provided investment incentives through either VAT or customs duty exemptions to tobacco companies to establish or expand manufacturing plants under the food and drink sector. Supported projects include the manufacturing of cigarettes, waterpipe tobacco, loose tobacco, cigarette paper and filters and processed tobacco.

International travelers can bring 600 cigarettes, 100 cigarillos, 50 cigars and 250 grams of tobacco into Istanbul. Plain packaging laws do not cover duty free sales of tobacco.

No. 4

Unnecessary interaction with the tobacco industry:

Indicator Score:

5 / 20

Top level government officials attend social functions and events such as awards presentation ceremonies to tobacco industry representatives for their success in exports and sales. For example, PHILSA (Philip Morris Sabanci Cigarette and Tobacco Industry and Trade Inc.) received the export champion award in 2017 and its General Manager received an award from the Prime Minister in 2018.

No. 5

Procedure for transparency measures:

Indicator Score:

10 / 20

There are no requirements for the disclosure or registration of tobacco industry entities, affiliated organizations or individuals acting on their behalf, including lobbyists.

No. 6

Avoiding conflicts of interest:

Indicator Score:

5 / 20

There is no prohibition on contributions from the tobacco industry. There is no evidence of retired senior government officials joining the tobacco industry.

No. 7

Preventive measures:

Indicator Score:

22 / 30

The government has not implemented a procedure for disclosing the records of interactions with the tobacco industry and its representatives. The government has not adopted or implemented a code of conduct for public officials to guide them when dealings with the tobacco industry.

The government does not have a program to consistently raise awareness on policies relating to Article 5.3 within its departments.

Law No. 4703 requires the tobacco industry to periodically submit information on tobacco production and manufacturing. However, this does not include providing information on marketing. Other activities, including lobbying, philanthropy and political contributions are prohibited.

Recommendations

These are ways Turkey can deter interference from the tobacco industry:

  • The government must have a program to consistently raise awareness on Article 5.3 within the departments.
  • The government must limit interactions with the tobacco industry to only when strictly necessary.
  • The government must implement a code of conduct for public officials to guide them when dealing with the tobacco industry.
  • The government must stop giving incentives to the tobacco industry such as VAT or customs duty exemptions and remove duty free sales of tobacco.

Get more information at about the Global Tobacco Industry Interference Index

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